An interview with ‘Secret Liberator’ Al Sirois

An interview with ‘Secret Liberator’ Al Sirois


(full video coming soon)
Four Canadians, as part of the Special Operations Executive, ran underground operations against the Nazi occupiers, and provided a spirit of resistance to the isolated French people. Striking Back includes interviews with Commandant Guy Bieler who operated in St Quentin from 1942-44, Frank Pickergill and John MacAllister’s short-lived Circuit, and Al Sirois, an SOE Wireless operator. The Gestapo hunted these men, torturing and executing those who were unfortunate enough to be caught. It is the story of incredible silent courage. Stream Secret Liberators on K&E.

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